This essay offers perspectives on the politics of Open Access publishing, paying particular attention to the potential effects a mandate like Plan S could have on the sociotechnical publishing systems on the continent. The essay includes a recorded discussion with scholars, activists and local publishers from the continent thinking together about how such policies might impact them and their colleagues’ everyday work.

This data is a supplement to a forthcoming thought piece for a special issue of Development and Change.

OKUNE, A., ADEBOWALE, S., GRAY, E., MUMO, A, AND ONIANG'O, R. (2020). DISCUSSION ON OPEN ACCESS (IN AFRICA) [TRANSCRIPT]. RESEARCH DATA SHARE.

Discussion on Open Access in Africa March 31, 2020 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM Nairobi Participants (listed alphabetically): Sulaiman Adebowale Eve Gray Angela Mumo Ruth Oniang'o Facilitator: Angela Okune Angela Okune 0:01 So maybe if we could go around and briefly mention how everyone kind of first began...Read more

Annotations

Plan S based on author-pay article processing charge (APC) model

KM: An important clarifying point to raise about the current Plan S is that while it pushes for making journals open access, it is based on an author-pay article processing charge (APC) model....Read more
PLAAS. 2020. “Food in the Time of the Coronavirus: Why We Should Be Very, Very Afraid.” Plaas (blog). April 1, 2020.
AO: During this discussion on Open Access, Eve Gray mentioned: 
"What is published hugely...there are now a lot of...Read more

Resources

Chan, Leslie. 2017. “Confessions of an Open Access Advocate | Confesiones de Un Defensor Del Acceso Abierto.” OCSDNET (blog). September 19, 2017.

AO: This blog post of an interview conducted with Leslie Chan who he worries that the Open Access movement may have in fact had the opposite of its original intended effect – instead of democratizing and enabling knowledge to be used by wider publics for local development, in his eyes, the...Read more